Category: Release Notes (page 2 of 3)

New Besa fragment published

We’ve published another small fragment of Besa on Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.  So Miyagawa has edited and translated the letter fragment known as On Lack of Food.  Read it online or search the letters of Besa we have published.

Annotation tools now include DDGLC Greek Loanword List

We are pleased to announce the release of our newest versions of some of our natural language processing tools for Coptic which incorporate the lemma list of loanwords developed by the Database and Dictionary of Greek Loanwords in Coptic (DDGLC).

The DDGLC is part of the KELLIA partnership between American and German digital Coptic projects funded by the NEH Office of Digital Humanities and the DFG.  The DDGLC, under the direction of Prof. Dr. Tonio Sebastian Richter, has been building a database of Greek loanwords in Coptic in order to facilitate the study of language contact, language borrowing, and multilingualism in Egypt.

We have integrated the Greek lemma list into our language of origin tagger, tokenizer and morphology analysis, and lemmatizer.

Our online natural language processing web service (which bundles together all of our NLP tools into one web application) also includes this new data from the DDGLC.

The Greek loanword list should greatly increase the accuracy of many of our tools.  If you use them, please let us know how it goes!

We at Coptic SCRIPTORIUM are grateful for this partnership and the generosity of the DDGLC team.

New born-digital edition of a Shenoute fragment

This winter we’ve released a new document we’ve been working on for a while.  It’s a born digital publication, in the sense that this document to our knowledge has never been published previously.  The edition and annotations here were produced by Elizabeth Platte (Reed College) and Rebecca S. Krawiec (Canisius College) directly from digital photographs of the manuscript for digital publication.

Read the manuscript transcription or the  normalized text, or query it in our database.

It’s a section of one of Shenoute’s texts for monks in volume three of his monastic Canons.  This 14-page (seven-folio) fragment now resides in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris and originally derives from the White Monastery codex known by the siglum MONB.YB.  We’ve released text and annotations for pages 307-320, which equate to the BN call number Ms Copte 130/2 ff. 51-57.  Digital photos are now available online at Gallica.

We’ve transcribed the text from images of the manuscript and then annotated it for manuscript information.  We’ve also broken the text down into the Coptic phrases known as “bound groups,” words, and morphs.  Then we’ve annotated it all for part of speech, loan words (Greek, Latin, etc.), and lemmas.

By “we” I mean primarily Platte and Krawiec .  Schroeder and Zeldes provided editorial review, as per our policy of having every published digital document reviewed by at least one editor.

As far as we know, this fragment has never been published; nor has any translation ever been published.  We don’t have a translation yet, either.

As the first born-digital edition, this document is an experiment for us.  Everything else we’ve worked with has been published in an edition, and sometimes even has an English translation that another scholar has published.  Even though we digitize from the original manuscript, previous editions and translations make the transcription, annotation, and editing process much easier.  This document is an unknown quantity.

This means we expect to have errors and welcome feedback on the document.

We also have no translation as of yet.  Our goal is to translate the document and then edit the transcription and annotations again as we work.  We hope to publish an essay on how the digital annotation process affected the creation of an edition.

In the meantime, use it to practice your Coptic.  Let us know if you find errors.  We’ll credit you.

New web application to read documents, cite data, and access data (BETA release)

We’re very excited to announce a new feature at Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.  We’ve created a new online web application that we think will allow users to read and reference our material much more easily.

Users can read Coptic documents on HTML pages taken from the data visualizations.  There are also easy links to our search tool ANNIS and to our GitHub repository for downloading files.

And we have a system of canonical URNS that provide persisent identifiers for documents, texts, authors, and text groups.   This means you can cite our data in your scholarship, and then readers will be able to back to our site and find our most recent versions of the documents you have cited.

We’ve got a little video to introduce it, or dive right in at http://data.copticscriptorium.org.

This is a BETA release, which means you might see a few things that need to be ironed out.  (For one thing, our small corpus of documentary papyri are not yet in the system — stay tuned, and in the meanwhile you can still read and query them in ANNIS.)  We are pretty pleased with how it’s turning out and look forward to future developments.

Many thanks to Bridget Almas of the Perseus Digital Library for helping us develop a canonical referencing system, and to Archimedes Digital for implementing the application.

 

 

Download release of all corpora in TEI XML, PAULA XML, relANNIS

We’ve released some new corpora (the papyri.info texts, for example) and some new documents to our existing corpora.  You can download everything in three different formats from our GitHub repository.  TEI XML, PAULA XML, and relANNIS.

Releasing new translation of section of Shenoute’s Acephalous Work 22

An English Translation (by Anthony Alcock) of part of Shenoute’s Acephalous Work 22 is available.  Anthony Alcock of the University of Kassel has contributed a translation of White Monastery Manuscript YA (MONB.YA) pages 421-28. This section corresponds to Leipoldt’s vol. 4, pp. 124-29. Coptic, English, and various annotations are available. Many thanks to Dr. Alcock for the contribution! We are in the process of a major addition to our website functionality, to enable you to read and find these texts more easily. In the meantime, you can access the text via our ANNIS search and visualization tool.  Click on the little page icon next to the shenoute.a22 corpus listing to see the visualizations.

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 3.50.07 PM of ANNIS corpus list

List of corpora in ANNIS

Read the English translation directly in the linguistic analysis view; read it as a pop-up when you hover over the Coptic in the normalized view.

screenshot: list of visualizations in ANNIS

Or search the English in ANNIS using a search string; to search for the word “work” in the English translations of Acephalous Work 22, use translation=/.*work.*/.

(Originally posted in March 2015 at http://copticscriptorium.org/)

Entire Sahidica New Testament now available

The entire Sahidica New Testament (machine-annotated) is now available. It has been tokenized and tagged for part of speech entirely automatically, using our tools. There has been no manual editing or correction. Visit our corpora for more information, or just jump in and search it in ANNIS.

 

(Originally posted in March 2015 at http://copticscriptorium.org/)

Fall 2014 Release Notes

A new release of material has been added to http://www.copticscriptorium.org:  more Sayings from the Coptic Apophthegmata Patrum, chapters 1 of Corinthians and additional chapters of the Gospel of Mark. Other release notes can be found here.

(Originally posted in Fall 2014 on http://www.copticscriptorium.org.)

Introducing the project texts and data model, and how to use ANNIS

To learn more about Coptic SCRIPTORIUM’s corpora, data model, and features,  here is a video on how to use the tool ANNIS into the world of Coptic. Thanks goes to Caroline T. Schroeder for the video from her youtube channel.

(Originally posted on copticscriptorium.org)

New material added: papyri

We’ve annotated and published in our search and visualization tool ANNIS two documentary papyri from papyri.info.

Click on the page icon next to the corpus name for a list of visualizations.

documentary papyri from papyri.info(Originally posted at copticscriptorium.org 5/26/15)

 

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