Category: Publications

White Paper for NEH DH Startup grant now online

We have concluded our round of “startup” funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities.  Our White Paper documents our activities and our outcomes for the period, including the following grant products:

  • A Digitized Coptic Corpus in Multiple Formats and Visualizations
  • Digital and Computational Tools (tokenizer, part of speech tagger, lemmatizer, and more and more)
  • ANNIS Database instance to query and search the multilayer corpus
  • Documentation in the toolsets, on our wiki, and on our blog
  • Web application for users to reading and cite visualizations of textual data
  • Symposium and workshop (“Digital Coptic 2,” March 2015) at Georgetown U + public tutorial and workshop at the Coptic Congress
  • Articles and conference papers to distribute the results of our work

CHECK IT OUT!  We heartily thank the NEH ODH for its support, as well as the NEH Preservation and Access division for their concurrent grant.  We also thank all of our participants, contributors, and collaborators, who are numerous and are outlined in the White Paper.

White Paper for NEH ODH Startup Grant

See also our White Paper for the P&A grant submitted in August.

NEH White Paper (Preservations and Access Grant) published

We at Coptic SCRIPTORIUM have been fortunate to have received three grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities for our work.   We cannot thank the NEH enough for its support.  So much of what we have done over the past 2+ years could not have happened without this funding.

We just completed a White Paper paper for a Foundations grant from the Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program in the Division of Preservation and Access.  The grant, “Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian,” ran from May 2104 until now.

Our White Paper documents our work and especially the standards and practices we developed for digitizing a pilot Coptic corpus.

If you want to know more about what truly interdisciplinary DH work looks like, check it out.  We try to break down the complexities of creating a digital corpus for research in linguistics, history, religious studies, biblical studies, manuscript studies.  We’ve got data models, workflows, digitization standards, transcription guidelines, and more all laid out for you here.

There is so much more to do; this is a only start.  Thanks to everyone who has had faith in our work.

White Paper, NEH Grant PW-51672-14 (Preservation and Access): “Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian” 29 August 2016

New feature + texts in our corpora: Apophthegmata, I See Your Eagerness

We are very excited to release new versions of two of our corpora in time for the Coptic Congress.  And keep reading to learn about a new feature on our website.

As usually, we provide a diplomatic transcription of the texts’ manuscripts, normalized text for ease of reading, and an analytic visualization with the normalized text and part of speech tags in our web application.  Plus you’ll see buttons to search the corpora in our database or download our digital files.

Apophthegmata Patrum

The Apophthegmata Patrum now contains 36 published Sayings.  New ones include

This release also marks the first contributions of our newest editor, Dr. Dana Lampe.  Dana earned her Ph.D. at the Catholic University of America is beginning a postdoc at Creighton in the fall.

I See Your Eagerness

We also are releasing a huge new chunk of Shenoute’s sermon, I See Your Eagerness.  These texts were transcribed and collated primarily by David Brakke (with some by Stephen Emmel).  We thank David for his  generous donation of his transcriptions to the project!  Senior Editor Rebecca Krawiec has digitized and annotated these transcriptions.

Please begin your read of I See Your Eagerness with the fragment from codex MONB.GL 9-10.   Or you can search it in our search & visualization tool ANNIS.

We now have over 9000 words of this text digitized and annotated!

New: “Next” & “Previous” Buttons on Document visualizations

We’ve got a new feature in our web application:  the “next” and “previous” buttons near the top of the text.

“Next” is the next document for this work; if there is a lacuna, you’ll be taken to the next extant witness we’ve digitized.  If there are multiple, parallel witnesses, you’ll be taken to the witness we’ve identified as the best or clearest witness (typically based on the amount of lacunae).

The same is true for the “Previous” button.

If you want to review the parallel witness(es), check out the metadatum field for each document called “witness.”  If a parallel witness exists, it will be listed; if we have digitized the witness, the URN for the witness will be listed.  You can enter the URN in the box at the top of our website to retrieve the document.

New publication: Raiders of the Lost Corpus in DHQ

Amir Zeldes and Caroline T. Schroeder have recently published an article in Digital Humanities Quarterly about the need for digital tools and a digitized corpus for Coptic, and research questions that drive Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.

“Raiders of the Lost Corpus” is freely available on the DHQ website as part of a special issue on Digital Methods and Classical Studies edited by Neil Coffee and Neil W. Bernstein.  Schroeder presented an earlier version of this paper at the Digital Classics conference at the University at Buffalo in 2013.

 

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