Tag: Zeldes

Online lexicon linked to our corpora!

We have a great announcement today.  Along with our German research partners as part of the KELLIA project, we are releasing an online Coptic lexicon linked to our corpora.

For over three years, the Berlin-Brandenberg Academy of Sciences has been working on a digital lexicon for Coptic.  Frank Feder began the work.  Frank Feder began creating it, encoding definitions for Coptic lemmas in three languages: English, French, and German. The final entries were completed by Maxim Kupreyev at the academy and Julien Delhez in Göttingen.  The base lexicon file is encoded in TEI-XML.  This summer Amir Zeldes and his student, Emma Manning, created a web interface.  We will release the source code soon as part of the KELLIA project.

It may still need some refinements and updates, but we think it is a useful achievement that will help anyone interested in Coptic.

Entries have definitions in French, German, and English.

You can use the lexicon as a standalone website.  For the pilot launch, it’s on the Georgetown server, but make no mistake, this is major research outcome for the BBAW.

We’ve also linked the dictionary to our texts in Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.  You can click on the ANNIS icon in the dictionary entry to search all corpora in Coptic SCRIPTORIUM for that word.

lexicon-to-ANNIS The link also goes in the other direction.  In the normalized visualization of our texts, you can click on a word and get taken to the entry for that word’s lemma in the dictionary.  You can do this in the normalized visualization in our web application for reading and accessing texts (pictured below), or in the normalized visualization embedded in the ANNIS tool.

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 10.22.39 AM

Of course there will be refinements and developments to come.  We would love to hear your feedback on what works, what could work better, and where you find glitches.

On a more personal note, when Amir and I first came up with the idea for the project, we dreamed of creating a Perseus Digital Library for Coptic.  This dictionary is a huge step forward.  And honestly, I myself had almost nothing to do with this piece of the project.  It’s an example of the importance and power of collaboration.

Coptic SCRIPTORIUM at the Coptic Congress

Much of the Coptic SCRIPTORIUM team is in Claremont this week for the Congress of the International Association of Coptic Studies.

We started out with a pre-conference, 2-day workshop with our KELLIA partners from Germany, where we worked on sharing data and technologies across digital Coptic projects.  Look here soon for an announcement about a really cool fruit of our labors.

Thursday there are two panels, and Friday there are two workshops.

Thursday 2-4 pm Coptic Digital Studies (Burkle 16)

David Brakke chair 

Prof. Dr. Caroline Schroeder, Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: A Digital Platform for Research in Coptic Language and Literature

Dr. Christine Luckritz Marquis, Reimagining the Apopthegmata Patrum in a Digital Culture

Prof. Amir Zeldes, A Quantitative Approach to Syntactic Alternations in Sahidic

Dr. Rebecca Krawiec, Charting Rhetorical Choices in Shenoute: Abraham our Father and I See Your Eagerness as case-studies

Thursday 4:30-6:30 Coptic Digital Humanities (Burkle 16)

Caroline T. Schroeder, Chair

Dr. Paul Dilley, Coptic Scriptorium beyond the Manuscript: Towards a Distant Reading of Coptic Texts

Mr. So Miyagawa and Dr. Marco Büchler, Computational Analysis of Text Reuse in Shenoute and Besa

Mr. Uwe Sikora, Text Encoding – Opportunities and Challenges

Ms. Eliese-Sophia Lincke, Optical Character Recogition (OCR) for Coptic. Testing Automated Digitization of Texts with OCRopy

 

Friday 11-12:30 Workshop on Coptic Fonts & Coptic Bible (AA)

Christian Askeland, Frank Feder

Friday 4:30-6 Digital Tools for Beginners (Workshop on Coptic SCRIPTORIUM)

Caroline T. Schroeder, Amir Zeldes, Rebecca S. Krawiec

New publication: Raiders of the Lost Corpus in DHQ

Amir Zeldes and Caroline T. Schroeder have recently published an article in Digital Humanities Quarterly about the need for digital tools and a digitized corpus for Coptic, and research questions that drive Coptic SCRIPTORIUM.

“Raiders of the Lost Corpus” is freely available on the DHQ website as part of a special issue on Digital Methods and Classical Studies edited by Neil Coffee and Neil W. Bernstein.  Schroeder presented an earlier version of this paper at the Digital Classics conference at the University at Buffalo in 2013.

 

New born-digital edition of a Shenoute fragment

This winter we’ve released a new document we’ve been working on for a while.  It’s a born digital publication, in the sense that this document to our knowledge has never been published previously.  The edition and annotations here were produced by Elizabeth Platte (Reed College) and Rebecca S. Krawiec (Canisius College) directly from digital photographs of the manuscript for digital publication.

Read the manuscript transcription or the  normalized text, or query it in our database.

It’s a section of one of Shenoute’s texts for monks in volume three of his monastic Canons.  This 14-page (seven-folio) fragment now resides in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris and originally derives from the White Monastery codex known by the siglum MONB.YB.  We’ve released text and annotations for pages 307-320, which equate to the BN call number Ms Copte 130/2 ff. 51-57.  Digital photos are now available online at Gallica.

We’ve transcribed the text from images of the manuscript and then annotated it for manuscript information.  We’ve also broken the text down into the Coptic phrases known as “bound groups,” words, and morphs.  Then we’ve annotated it all for part of speech, loan words (Greek, Latin, etc.), and lemmas.

By “we” I mean primarily Platte and Krawiec .  Schroeder and Zeldes provided editorial review, as per our policy of having every published digital document reviewed by at least one editor.

As far as we know, this fragment has never been published; nor has any translation ever been published.  We don’t have a translation yet, either.

As the first born-digital edition, this document is an experiment for us.  Everything else we’ve worked with has been published in an edition, and sometimes even has an English translation that another scholar has published.  Even though we digitize from the original manuscript, previous editions and translations make the transcription, annotation, and editing process much easier.  This document is an unknown quantity.

This means we expect to have errors and welcome feedback on the document.

We also have no translation as of yet.  Our goal is to translate the document and then edit the transcription and annotations again as we work.  We hope to publish an essay on how the digital annotation process affected the creation of an edition.

In the meantime, use it to practice your Coptic.  Let us know if you find errors.  We’ll credit you.

Corpora and how to use ANNIS

Coptic SCRIPTORIUM provides Coptic texts for reading, analysis, and complex searches. For a full list of our text corpora, please click here. We have also added answers to who and what some people and terms mean on our main site. A video tutorial given by Amir Zeldes and Caroline T. Schroeder is also available on how to search our database using the tool ANNIS.

 

(Originally posted in December of 2014 at http://copticscriptorium.org/)

Our lightning round presentation at the NEH is now online

We gave a brief presentation about Coptic SCRIPTORIUM at the NEH Office of Digital Humanities Project Directors’ meeting in September.  We’re at the 9:38 time marker.  Video is from the NEHgov channel on youtube.

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