Tag: corpora (page 1 of 3)

New release of the Coptic Treebank

Coptic Treebank release 2.1, now with three Letters of Besa!

We are pleased to announce the release of the latest version of the Coptic Treebank, now containing three Letters of Besa:

  • On Lack of Food
  • To Aphthonia
  • To Thieving Nuns

This brings the total corpus size up to 10,499 tokens, thanks to annotation work by Elizabeth Davidson and Amir Zeldes, building on earlier transcription and tagging work by Coptic Scriptorium and KELLIA partners. Special thanks are due to So Miyagawa for providing the transcription for On Lack of Food. The corpus will continue to grow as we work to annotate more data and improve the accuracy of our automatic syntax parser for Coptic. You can search the current version of the corpus in ANNIS here:

https://corpling.uis.georgetown.edu/annis/scriptorium

Or download the latest raw annotated data from GitHub here:

https://github.com/universalDependencies/UD_Coptic/tree/dev

Please let us know if you find any errors or have any feedback on the treebank!

Old Testament corpus release

We are happy to announce the release of the automatically annotated Sahidic Old Testament corpus (corpus identifier: sahidic.ot), based on the version of the available texts kindly provided by the CrossWire Bible Society SWORD Project thanks to work by Christian Askeland, Matthias Schulz and Troy Griffitts.

The corpus is available for search in ANNIS, much like the Sahidica New Testament corpus, together with word segmentation, morphological analysis, language of origin for loanwords, part of speech tagging and automatically aligned verse translations (except for parts of Jeremiah). Please expect some errors, due the fully automatic analysis in the corpus. The aligned translation is taken from the World English Bible. Here is an example search for the word ‘soul’:

norm=”ⲯⲩⲭⲏ”

You can also read entire chapters in ANNIS or at our repository, which look like this:

urn:cts:copticLit:ot.gen.crosswire:09

 

We hope that this resource will be helpful to Coptic scholars – please let us know if you have any questions or comments!

 

New Tutorials & Recent Workshop Wrap-up

Coptic Scriptorium team members Caroline T. Schroeder and Rebecca Krawiec recently led a workshop on Digital Corpora and Digital Editions at the North American Patristics Society annual meeting.   We created detailed tutorials useful to both beginners and more advanced users on our GitHub site.  These tutorials cover:

  • an introduction to digital editions and corpora
  • working with the online Coptic Dictionary
  • simple and complex searching Coptic literature in our database ANNIS
  • creating a digital corpus with Epidoc TEI-XML annotations and natural language processing

We invite everyone to use these tutorials on their own.  They’re designed for for self-paced work.

We were pleased to participate in the pre-conference Digital Humanities workshops that included another session on mapping led by Sarah Bond and Jennifer Barry.  We had attendees from four countries, who ranged in their careers from graduate students to senior professors.  Thanks to NAPS for hosting these workshops, and to the NEH and the DFG for making our work possible.

New Release of Corpora

We’re pleased to announce that we’ve released more texts in our corpora.

The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (Apophthegmata Patrum) corpus now contains 52 sayings/apophthegms (>7100 words).  We have edited previously published sayings for consistency in annotation, and we’ve released new sayings edited by Christine Luckritz Marquis, Elizabeth Platte, and our newest contributor, Dana Robinson.  Read or browse the Sayings online.  Click on the “Analytic” button to see read a saying in Coptic with a parallel English translation + part of speech tags for each Coptic word.

Or click on the “Norm” button (short for “normalized”) to read the Coptic.  Clicking on any Coptic word in the normalized visualization will take you to an online Coptic-English dictionary.  Hovering your cursor over a passage in the normalized visualization will show the English translation in a pop up window.

AP 96 Normalized view screenshot

AP 96 Normalized view screenshot

Shenoute’s I See Your Eagerness now has numerous new manuscript fragments published (over 16,000 words).  We also have edited previously published witnesses for consistency in annotation.  These documents were transcribed and collated from the manuscripts by David Brakke and annotated for digital publication by Rebecca Krawiec.  Now you can read Shenoute’s I See Your Eagerness in nearly its entirety in Coptic.  We provide several paths for you to explore this text:

  1. Read the text from start to end, beginning with the first manuscript fragment. Click “NEXT” to keep reading.
    MONB.GL fragment D diplomatic visualization

    MONB.GL fragment D diplomatic visualization

    (No English translation is provided, but in the “Note” metadata field below the Coptic, you can find page numbers for David Brakke’s and Andrew Crislip’s translation in their book, Discourses of Shenoute.)  “Next” and “Previous” buttons will take you through the path we consider optimal for reading the text. This path wanders through various manuscript witnesses, following the path with the fewest lacunae. Want to see parallel witnesses? Check out the “Witness” metadata field below the text.

    MONB.GL 29-30 metadata screenshot

    MONB.GL 29-30 metadata screenshot

  2. Read through all surviving pages in one codex/manuscript witness by filtering for a particular codex. Click through the documents in that codex.  For example, if you want to read through all the fragments of codex MONB.GL, go to data.copticscriptorium.org, and use the menu to filter by Corpus for the shenoute.eagerness corpus, and then filter by manuscript name for the MONB.GL codex.   Click through the documents in that codex.
  3. Perform a search/query in our ANNIS database.   For example, search for all occurrences of “wicked” (ⲡⲟⲛⲏⲣⲟⲛ) in the corpus.  Or, search for occurrences of “wicked” controlling for duplicate hits in parallel manuscript witnesses.  See our guide to queries in ANNIS  for more tips.

You also can download the entire corpus in TEI XML, PAULA XML, and relANNIS formats  from our GitHub site.

New release – Coptic Treebank V2

We are happy to announce the release of version 2 of the Coptic Universal Dependency Treebank. With over 8,500 tokens from 14 documents, the Treebank is the largest syntactically annotated resource in Coptic. The annotation scheme follows the Universal Dependency Guidelines, version 2, and is therefore comparable with UD data from 70 treebanks in 50 languages, including English, Latin, Classical Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and more.

You can search in the Treebank using ANNIS. For example, the following query finds cases of verbs dominating a complement clause (e.g. “say …. that …”):

pos="V" ->dep[func="ccomp"] norm

[Link to this query]

December 2016 corpus release (v 2.2.0)

We are happy to release the following new and revised documents to our corpora.  A copy of the official release notes is below.  The data is available for download from GitHub in TEI XML, PAULA XML, and relANNIS formats.  The corpora can be viewed and accessed at data.copticscriptorium.org, and they all can  be queried in ANNIS. We plan for another release with more documents in March 2017.

As always:  if you have comments or corrections, please submit a pull request on GitHub or send us an email at contact [at] copticscriptorium [dot] org.

____

This corpus release includes new or revised documents for:

  • 1 Corinthians: machine and manual annotations; new documents are chapters 13-16; edits to already published chapters include corrections and modifications to lemmas, normalization, part of speech, and/or tokenization to conform to evolving guidelines
  • Mark: machine and manual annotations; edits to already published chapters include corrections and modifications to lemmas, normalization, part of speech, and/or tokenization to conform to evolving guidelines
  • Not Because a Fox Barks (Shenoute): machine and manual annotations; edits to already published document include corrections and modifications to lemmas, normalization, part of speech, and/or tokenization to conform to evolving guidelines
  • Besa letters: machine and manual annotations; edits to already published documents include corrections and modifications to lemmas, normalization, part of speech, and/or tokenization to conform to evolving guidelines

All other documents in our corpora are unchanged from the last release.

New metadata and corpus feature: We are beginning to add to our documents a metadata field called “order” which will allow us to present documents in a logical order for browsing or reading. We’ve implemented it in the Besa letters, corpus and will roll it out for other corpora in the future. Our Document Retrieval web application (data.copticscriptorium.org) now lists the documents in the order in which they appear in the manuscript tradition, when you filter for that corpus. Thus, users who wish to read or browse the documents in that order can do so easily.

Version control: We have set the version number on our document metadata, corpus metadata (in ANNIS), and release information (in GitHub) all to match. Version #s and dates are only revised when a document is revised. So if no documents in our AP corpus have been revised and republished, or no new documents for that corpus have been published, then the version # on the documents and corpus do not change. Only new and newly edited documents (and their corpora) will have version 2.2.0 and date 08 December 2016 in their metadata.

Server updates – part of site down tonight

We are making some updates to the document application at data.copticscriptorium.org tonight (13 December 2016) approximately 7:30-8:30 pm Pacific time/10:30-11:30 Eastern time.  The service may be down.

You can still query and access our corpora in the ANNIS database at https://corpling.uis.georgetown.edu/annis/scriptorium .  That service will not be affected.  Thanks!

NEH White Paper (Preservations and Access Grant) published

We at Coptic SCRIPTORIUM have been fortunate to have received three grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities for our work.   We cannot thank the NEH enough for its support.  So much of what we have done over the past 2+ years could not have happened without this funding.

We just completed a White Paper paper for a Foundations grant from the Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program in the Division of Preservation and Access.  The grant, “Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian,” ran from May 2104 until now.

Our White Paper documents our work and especially the standards and practices we developed for digitizing a pilot Coptic corpus.

If you want to know more about what truly interdisciplinary DH work looks like, check it out.  We try to break down the complexities of creating a digital corpus for research in linguistics, history, religious studies, biblical studies, manuscript studies.  We’ve got data models, workflows, digitization standards, transcription guidelines, and more all laid out for you here.

There is so much more to do; this is a only start.  Thanks to everyone who has had faith in our work.

White Paper, NEH Grant PW-51672-14 (Preservation and Access): “Coptic SCRIPTORIUM: Digitizing a Corpus for Interdisciplinary Research in Ancient Egyptian” 29 August 2016

New feature + texts in our corpora: Apophthegmata, I See Your Eagerness

We are very excited to release new versions of two of our corpora in time for the Coptic Congress.  And keep reading to learn about a new feature on our website.

As usually, we provide a diplomatic transcription of the texts’ manuscripts, normalized text for ease of reading, and an analytic visualization with the normalized text and part of speech tags in our web application.  Plus you’ll see buttons to search the corpora in our database or download our digital files.

Apophthegmata Patrum

The Apophthegmata Patrum now contains 36 published Sayings.  New ones include

This release also marks the first contributions of our newest editor, Dr. Dana Lampe.  Dana earned her Ph.D. at the Catholic University of America is beginning a postdoc at Creighton in the fall.

I See Your Eagerness

We also are releasing a huge new chunk of Shenoute’s sermon, I See Your Eagerness.  These texts were transcribed and collated primarily by David Brakke (with some by Stephen Emmel).  We thank David for his  generous donation of his transcriptions to the project!  Senior Editor Rebecca Krawiec has digitized and annotated these transcriptions.

Please begin your read of I See Your Eagerness with the fragment from codex MONB.GL 9-10.   Or you can search it in our search & visualization tool ANNIS.

We now have over 9000 words of this text digitized and annotated!

New: “Next” & “Previous” Buttons on Document visualizations

We’ve got a new feature in our web application:  the “next” and “previous” buttons near the top of the text.

“Next” is the next document for this work; if there is a lacuna, you’ll be taken to the next extant witness we’ve digitized.  If there are multiple, parallel witnesses, you’ll be taken to the witness we’ve identified as the best or clearest witness (typically based on the amount of lacunae).

The same is true for the “Previous” button.

If you want to review the parallel witness(es), check out the metadatum field for each document called “witness.”  If a parallel witness exists, it will be listed; if we have digitized the witness, the URN for the witness will be listed.  You can enter the URN in the box at the top of our website to retrieve the document.

Coptic Treebank Released

Yesterday we published the first public version of the Coptic Universal Dependency Treebank. This resource is the first syntactically annotated corpus of Coptic, containing complete analyses of each sentence in over 4,300 words of Coptic excerpts from Shenoute, the New Testament and the Apophthegmata Patrum.

To get an idea of the kind of analysis that Treebank data gives use, compare the following examples of an English and a Coptic dependency syntax tree. In the English tree below, the subject and object of the verb ‘depend’ on the verb for their grammatical function – the nominal subject (nsubj) is “I”, and the direct object (dobj) is “cat”.

cat_mat

We can quickly find out what’s going on in a sentence or ‘who did what to whom’ by looking at the arrows emanating from each word. The same holds for this Coptic example, which uses the same Universal Dependencies annotation schema, allowing us to compare English and Coptic syntax.

He gave them to the poor

He gave them to the poor

Treebanks are an essential component for linguistic research, but they also enable a variety of Natural Language Processing technologies to be used on a language. Beyond automatically parsing text to make some more analyzed data, we can use syntax trees for information extraction and entity recognition. For example, the first tree below shows us that “the Presbyter of Scetis” is a coherent entity (a subgraph, headed by a noun); the incorrect analysis following it would suggest Scetis is not part of the same unit as the Presbyter, meaning we could be dealing with a different person.

One time, the Presbyter of Scetis went...

One time, the Presbyter of Scetis went…

One time, the Presbyter went from Scetis... (incorrect!)

One time, the Presbyter went from Scetis… (incorrect!)

To find out more about this resource, check out the new Coptic Treebank webpage. And to read where the Presbyter of Scetis went, go to this URN: urn:cts:copticLit:ap.19.monbeg.

Older posts

© 2017

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑